Food: freestyle experiences

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Edible flowers to eat March 22, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — caroschm @ 3:13 pm

I need your help : when I was young, I was used to gather a violet flower to nibble it somehow. It was rather sweet and romantic. The problem is I cannot remember its name. Have your ever done the same? Do you remember wich flower it is? I can also hear Thalie and Franck teasing me : mmhhh you have “smoked the carpet”, haven’t you?

Anyway this current post is about the flowers we can…eat.

We are in spring yet so I decided to review the most important thing to know about this subject.

First of all, we need to be very careful : is it useful to tell you not to eat flowers obtained from a florist? The best thing is to know someone who make them grow in his garden to be sure they are completely pesticide-free. I read an interesting advice : . it is better to pick the flowers in the morning or late afternoon when the water content is high.

Besides it is necessary to wash them thoroughly (do not eat a forgotten dead bug) by bathing them in a bath of salt water and drain on paper towels.

So you are ready for a flower recipe from http://www.foodreference.com

Zucchini Blossom Frittata

18 large zucchini flowers
• 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
• 2 cups dry white wine
• 2 teaspoons baking powder
• Salt
• 3 tablespoons olive oil
• 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
• 10 eggs
• 1/4 cup milk
• 1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
• Freshly ground black pepper
• Vegetable oil for frying
• 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary leaves
• 1/2 cup grated ricotta salata

Directions
Check the insides of the zucchini flowers for insects and shake them out. Brush any dirt off the flowers, but do not wash them or the flowers won’t be crisp when you fry them. Chop 6 of the flowers and set aside.

In a bowl, combine the flour, wine, baking powder, and a pinch of salt and refrigerate for 1 hour (a little more or less is okay). Heat the olive oil in a medium  skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and chopped zucchini flowers and cook until the onion becomes translucent, about 5 minutes. Scrape the onion and zucchini flowers into a mixing bowl. Add the eggs, milk, parsley, and salt and pepper to taste and mix well.

Heat the oven to 300°F

Place 3/4 inch of vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet with the rosemary. Heat the oil over high heat. The oil must be very hot. You can test it by throwing a dash of flour into the oil. If the flour pops, the oil is ready for frying. Dunk the zucchini flowers into the batter and place them gently in the hot oil. Don’t put too many flowers in at once or it will bring down the temperature of the oil, and they mustn’t touch sides or they will stick together. Do not flip the flowers over until you can see that the lower edges have turned golden brown, about 2 minutes. If you are using an iron skillet and the flowers stick, let them cook 30 seconds more. Turn the flowers over with tongs and fry for an additional minute, then remove and drain on paper towels. Do not add more battered flowers until you are sure the oil has come up in temperature again. Sprinkle with salt and set aside.

Place half of the fried flowers on the bottom of an ovenproof nonstick pan in a pinwheel pattern Pour half of the egg mixture on top. Add the ricotta salata, then another layer of fried zucchini flowers. Add the remaining egg mixture, cover, and bake for 30 minutes, until a knife plunged into the center comes out clean. Allow to rest for 15 minutes, and then flip the frittata over onto a serving platter. Cut into wedges.

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16 Responses to “Edible flowers to eat”

  1. ihssene Says:

    I always thought that only cows love eat flowers! lol
    I never tried to eat flowers…have you ever tried Caroline?

    • carolille Says:

      Oh yes, but you have to be carefull because some flowers can contains some poisons.
      anyway i rather share the nice, famous, and honored goat family

  2. thalounette Says:

    Have you already made this recipe Caro?

  3. thalounette Says:

    Many people have been speaking about edible flowers for years now and you can eat them with a drink before eating, or as a first course, as a dessert, whenever you want to have a flower in fact!
    I have never tried them… I guess I see flowers more like real plants, growing in a garden, than on my plate! But why not give them a try 🙂
    People should be aware that poisonous plants and flowers exist and should not pick flowers like that in the countryside for instance…

    • carolille Says:

      You are RIGHT !!! We have to be very carefull, but you can find somme lists of edible flowers we can eat.
      Do you know the name of the flower i was speaking about in my post. This one is edible and delicious….

      • thalounette Says:

        Even if you have a precise list, you are not always sure it’s the right one when you pluck flowers… I read many articles telling that people ate flowers/plants looking nearly like an edible one, and poisoned themselves. That’s lame!
        I grew up in Reunion Island, I cannot help you Caro 😀 But that’s funny because I was doing the same thing with a flower from there when I was little girl!

  4. thalounette Says:

    *a little girl

  5. davelecteur Says:

    Your discussion reminds me a bit of Into The Wild. In the story (a true story), the main character has a book with pictures telling him exactly what plants he can eat and which ones he has to be careful of. But he gets two very similar plants mixed up, with disastrous results! It would be easy to take for granted the fact that we eat so many different vegetables: why shouldn’t flowers be safe? Well, I can imagine asking myself that same question, lost in the middle of a forest somewhere, and hoping to find a tomato plant or some potatoes! … I think I would stay away from the mushrooms.

    Some English tips Caroline:
    – The title “edible flowers to eat” is a bit of a tautology
    – “I (sometimes) used to gather”
    – “We are in Spring now” (not “yet”, this is more of a negative word, e.g. “we are not in Spring yet”)
    – “best thing is to know someone who CAN GROW THEM in his garden”
    – “I read an interesting advice” –> “advice” is always singular, so it’s got to be “an interesting piece of advice”
    – “Besides it is necessary” –> “Besides that, it is…” / “Moreover, / what’s more, it is…”
    – Check your verbs for consistency in this sentence: “by bathing them in a bath of salt water and drain on paper towels”

    • thalounette Says:

      I have seen Into the Wild – I also read the book a few weeks ago in fact – that’s actually why I was talking about eating something you thought were edible, but were not at all 😀

      • davelecteur Says:

        cool I saw the film a little while ago, then read the book. I thought they were quite complimentary, like it wasn’t obvious that the book was much better than the film or anything. the film was really beautiful! but long..

  6. soizic Says:

    I heard that it wasn’t very tasty… but i think that’s it depend on what kind of flower you will eat…

    • thalounette Says:

      If you don’t like salads and other types of vegetables, I think it will be difficult to like edible flowers too 😀 But I heard the same thing Soizic!

  7. deb1708 Says:

    flowers you can eat! that is interesting!
    I think I am an ignorant person when it is about food.
    Your recipe sounds good so why not tryin a “flowery” dish?

    • thalounette Says:

      No Deb, you are not ignorant when it comes to food!
      I am just a real fan of food and cooking and I happened to know about those flowers that’s all 😀
      What do you mean by ‘flowery’ dish?


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